About your Search

20110721
20110721
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
unfortunately turned ugly. (laughter) as of now, london's two top policemen at scotland yard let's call them officer blu rotton has resigned. andrew colton has been arrested and sunday tragically authorities arrested poor mrs. weasley. (laughter) wait, no that's not mrs. weasley. sorry, tragically, authorities arrested the guy from simply red. yeah, that's it. actually, arrested was rebekah brooks, the woman who ran "news of the world" during the worst of-- as the british call them-- the troubles. (laughter) brooks had already resigned her post friday, ostensibly to spend more time with her rabbit hair dresser. laug(laughter) that was a deep cut. i appreciate that that was a deep cut. honestly, it is hard to imagine this story... (laughter). all right. it's hard to imagine this story getting more out of control. >> breaking news. >> on the british hacking scandal, just a short time ago, police say sean hoare-- that's the reporter who first alleged widespread hacking at the now ended news of nation-- he's been found dead in his home. (laughter). >> jon: do you think he died of natural causes
prevent anyone from hacking into your phone. >> reporter: scotland yard has set up a line to deal with the surge. >>> a man pulled to safety in north baltimore. found a man in a deep ravine. the man's injuries prompted a special operation to rescue him. the fire department says he's going to be okay. >>> new information tonight with the city cop accused of running a drug on the police department's time. wiretap conversations reveal how brazen the operation was. investigates the inner workings of the plot. >> reporter: say couriers would make the 11 hour flight to dull us international, runners would take the drugs to baltimore and that's where the officer comes in. worked with red to get the heroin to street level dealers. >> the couriers made $15,000 per trip. so they made a lot of money off of it. >> reporter: details coded wiretapped conversations. and says you can hear the officer's police radio under some of them. in one detail he tells him, yeah, that's all it's going to be, $200 for me, the rest for you. and the reply, we all eat these get peanuts until we hit the big brake
to scotland, too? does include the issues such as policing that have evolved in scotland? >> it does extend it to scotland. we were able to accept a number of points. there was one specific point that the scottish administration wanted dealt with. it concerned the information commissioner's report. it will be dealt with by the inquiry because it is such an important part of the work. when it comes to the relationship between politicians and media, this inquiry will be able to go where the evidence leads. >> there were allegations against some offices and the metropolitan police. protecting us and doing a wonderful job and should not be smeared by this? >> that's an incredibly important point police officers put their lives on the line for us every single day. and while, of course, we have to get to the bottom of what went wrong in the met, we shouldn't allow that to undermine the public confidence the people have in the bobby on the beat and the fantastic job they do for us. >> mr. richard burton. >> in response from the question from my right honorable friend, the prime minister said if he
's already left the prime minister scrambling, the head of scotland yard has resigned and today, a scathing parliamentary report accuses rupert murdoch's company of deliberately trying to thwart a criminal investigation into the illegal activities of his newspaper here. >> isn't it time that we sent this non-taxpaying murdoch back from whence he came? >> reporter: the prime minister didn't have to. murdoch boarded his private jet this afternoon to fly home to the u.s. no doubt happy to leave london and all the turbulence behind. jeffrey kofman, abc news, london. >> and questions tonight about where the controversy will go when he lands back here at home. >>> and still ahead here on "world news" this wednesday night, broken promises this evening. an entire town gathered and told that those promised pensions? we can't afford. so, now what? >>> and this comes as we look here for new solutions. this evening, the one thing you should ask your boss about tomorrow morning to keep your retirement dream alive. >>> and then later here on "world news," what would you do? or better yet, what would your
of the metropolitan police, refer to as scotland yard, have worked for news international advising them in a pr capacity. what worked for the government. there is this kind of seedy revolving door between the police and as powerful media company. as i said, when it is calms down a little, police need to look at self-policing, especially with regard to what people do after they left. but it also seems to be an issue plane corruption. police were being bribed by journalists to provide information. that could end up, as the caller said, it has not been that big a part of the story yet. we could have police facing disciplinary hearings if not criminal prosecutions. host: do you see potential of this bringing down the camden government? guest: -- cameron government? guest: people are beginning to think that. if he had an election in six months, it would be serious. it does not look very good. the scandal last year broke a lot of trust in politicians. now you have got a prime minister who appointed someone, his former communications director, a former editor of "news of the world" when the hacking wa
a big deal from afar but it's already left the prime minister scrambling, the head of scotland yard has resigned, and a skating parliamentary report accused rupert murdoch's company of deliberately trying to thwart a criminal investigation into the illegal activities of his newspaper here. >> isn't it time that we sent this non-tax paying murdoch back from whence he came? >> reporter: the prime minister didn't have to. murdoch boarded his private jet to fly home to the u.s. no doubt happy to leave london and all the turbulence behind. jeffrey cough rkofman, abc news loloon. >> certainly not over yet though as this continues to grow and we're investigating issues here. people, perhaps 9/11 victims, who might have had their cell phones hacked. >> it's scary. judging by the atmosphere there. and the number two, headlines in australia this morning, now that country may be stepping into the investigation to see if phone hacking occurred on their turf. so this thing's snowballing out of control. >> that's for sure. agreed. although you can hop in your private jet and head home. >> slithering
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)